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Cinnamon Almond Snack Cookies {Grain Free, Vegan, Low Carb}

You know those roasted cinnamon almonds you find at festivals? The ones that make your mouth water just smelling them… but you know they are loaded with sugar and carbs, so you just pretend that smelling them is enough?

Well, you don’t have to fake it anymore! When these cookies were baking, my kitchen smelled just like cinnamon almonds, mmmm. They are made with almond butter and almond flour, as well as sugar substitutes to keep the carbs low. In fact, the carbs are SO low, that I added 70% dark chocolate, and they are still only 2.6g net carbs per cookie. No guilt or grain here!

I found that the dough was a bit sticky feeling, and slightly oily as I shaped the balls, but it turned out nicely. I tested a few different types in the batch I just made… one plain, cross-hatched like peanut butter cookies, one with chocolate pressed into the center, and one with chocolate and toasted almonds. No surprise that I liked that last version the most! I also sprinkled just a little large-flake kosher salt on them at the very end to set the chocolate off. If you like a mildly sweet cookie, I would start with the lower amounts of sweeteners, if you like it sweeter, adjust to your taste. I like mine a little less-sweet, as my tastes have changed over the past months. This is a slightly chewy, medium-dense cookie, pretty filling.

I’d also like to note that this is the first recipe that I have made with the blanched almond flour that I just bought at our local bulk store (Countryview for those in my area!) and so far I like it! The grind seems similar to the flour from Nuts.com, and the price is $4.79 per pound.

Cinnamon Almond Snack Cookies

  • 1/2 C almond butter
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 Tb coconut oil (or butter if you prefer)
  • 2-3 Tb Truvia (I used 2)
  • 1.5 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 C almond flour
  • 2-3 Tb powdered erythritol (I used 2)
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 5 Dark chocolate squares (optional) or vegan chocolate
  • toasted almonds (optional)
  1. Preheat oven to 350. In a large bowl, combine first 6 ingredients and mix well.
  2. Sift together almond flour, erythritol, baking soda and salt, and add to almond butter mixture.
  3. Drop by tablespoonfuls onto cookie sheet lined with baking parchment.
  4. Flatten balls into discs with your fingers. Wet fingers slightly if the dough is too sticky.
  5. If using chocolate squares, chop each square into 4 quarters, and press one piece into each cookie.
  6. Bake for 3 minutes, and then remove from oven if using toasted almonds.
  7. Place nuts on top of the chocolate, rotate pan, and return to oven for 5-8 minutes for a total cooking time of 8-11 minutes.
  8. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.
    Makes about 20 cookies. 1.6g net carbs per cookie plain, 2.6 per cookie with chocolate pieces.

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Jumping Plateaus and Updating the Blog

It has been a rather busy week, and I am a bit behind on posting here, although it’s certainly been on my mind! In fact, yesterday, I gave the About Me/Contact page a serious update as it was definitely overdue. When I first started blogging, I wasn’t sure quite where it would go, or how the grain free lifestyle would suit us, never mind would I enjoy doing it enough to continue! Well, the good news is that you aren’t rid of me yet, it seems I am still finding things to say and cook 😉

This past weekend was wonderful, spent up north in Michigan with friends, enjoying campfires and lazy tubing down the Au Sable River. We had a great time, shared lots of laughs and good food. But… I also gained 5lbs! I know it was too many fruity drinks and being off my game for food choices, indulging in a few too many carbs (though no gluten or grain.) The good news though, is that it’s just 3 days later, I got serious about my plan again, and the weight is gone already… YAY me!! This is especially exciting because I have been on a weight-loss stall. I think I need to talk about that with you.

What about those pesky PLATEAUS??

The thing that I always stress to people when talking about this style of eating, is that weight loss is a side effect of cutting the carbs, but that getting rid of the wheat and grain toxins is what has had the most profound effect on my health. While that is absolutely true, and I feel like a new person especially without the severe chronic headaches and joint pain, I am like any other girl (or boy!), and would love to reach a more ideal weight!

So while I don’t eat grains now, and very little sugar, I realize that I also need to tweak my food in order to keep losing. The first 3 months I dropped 25lbs, rather easily. The past month or so, however, I have only been maintaining. Easily maintaining, but a plateau none the less.

I have at least 25lbs left to lose (halfway there, maybe!) So…  I have been examining my diet more closely and looking for causes for the weight loss stall, and possible solutions. The following list is what I have come up with:

  • I am eating more fruit than I should (it’s so good in season!)… so I am going to severely cut my fruit intake for the next week to see if that will help. I can add some of this back for weight maintenance or after my fat-burning is jump-started again.
  • I have been indulging in too much wine and hard cider drinks. Not constantly, but I have a feeling that even a glass or 2 of those carbs a couple times a week is undoing potential progress… so no booze this coming week! Not so easy when there are fun summer gatherings with friends, cookouts and hot days, but I think it’s probably key. So instead…
  • I am going to drink more water, as I have read about how much dehydration can slow weight loss as well as inhibit other important bodily functions. I will also drink more lemon water for vitamin C and aiding in digestion and detox.
  • I *try* to eat enough fat, but I think that I am still not getting as much as I need to have in order to really be in ketosis. I am upping the coconut oil, bacon and butter to see if intentionally eating more will have an effect. I have a feeling it will. It is so contrary to the low-fat mentality we have been brain-washed with, but to burn fat as fuel, the body needs fat!
  • I am working on getting better sleep.I have a tendency to wake after just half a nights’ sleep, and then toss or lay there the rest of the night. I know that proper sleep is important in weight loss, so this is something that has to be addressed. I broke down and took something to help me sleep twice this week, and it really helped me feel better. Last night, instead, I decided it was time to add the

    After a walk with my son today at the woodland park. What a beautiful day!

    Magnesium Malate to my supplement regimen, as it is supposed to help with rest as well as a number of other issues. I found that I slept well last night with the Magnesium, so will continue and see if it improves my rest overall.

  • I am also going to monitor my dairy intake because I know that it has an insulin-stimulating effect in some people (insulin is the fat storage hormone.) Going to try going a little lighter on the cheeses while adding veggies and other fats.
  • I am active, and yet I know I don’t exercise enough. I’m not talking about anything strenuous, but getting out to walk or ride my bike more often will help… if not the weight loss, I know it will help my attitude and stress levels! Today, my son went with me to a local woodland park along the river, and we walked for a good 45 minutes on trails where we could enjoy nature. It was great and we both agreed we need to go a few times a week.

OK, so after making my list, I have a game plan!

  1. Nix the fruit (for now)
  2. Nix the booze 😉
  3. Drink more water and lemon water.
  4. Increase fats for ketosis.
  5. Take Magnesium for improved sleep.
  6. Decrease dairy.
  7. Get moving, walk.

That all sounds rather do-able! I think that once I break the stall and get back fully to burning fats again, I should be able to lighten up on the fruit and wine restrictions. I’ve got to have something to hope for anyway!

 

It’s your turn to share:

What have you done to successfully break a plateau when losing weight? I have heard lots of abstract suggestions (such as switch it up, shock the system, etc), but I am interested in which ones specifically have worked for you now or in the past? If you are on a plateau now, and want to get back to losing weight, what are some of the things you will try? I am hoping to see some interesting ideas from you all!

 

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Pizza: Cheese-Crusted, Gluten-free, Grain-free!

Now, if you are not a low-carber, you may want to avert your eyes…

No really, do it now. I’ll wait.

If you are still reading, I am going to assume that a pizza crust made with 3 kinds of cheese, eggs, and no flour is RIGHT up your alley! I will admit that while I am 99% grain free (other than an occasional delectable sushi roll, oops) even I was feeling a little guilty with this cheesy indulgence, but it sure was good!

Many of you have either found me through my posts on the Wheat Belly blog or Facebook page, and even if you found me through the wonderful world of food and health blogging, you likely know how enthusiastic I am about the wheat free lifestyle! One of the cool things about being part of a thriving Wheat Belly (WB) community online is that everyone is more than happy to share their experiences, advice and recipe tips! In a recent post, after I suggested the Socca Pizza crust with Garbanzo flour, a fellow WB’er shared her favorite gluten-free pizza crust recipe (which is veryyyy low carb), and I gave it a whirl… YUMMO!

So, since one good turn deserves another, I am sharing the link to the original page HERE, at Gluten Free Easily, with pictures of a very classic-looking pepperoni pizza. I will definitely have to make this version when I have pepperoni on hand, but since I didn’t, I improvised with what I did have.

Here you see the crust ingredients spread into a parchment-lined pan.

Cooked up and ready to be decked out!

Sauteed crimini mushrooms

Wilted spinach and garlic.

Our Pizza toppings included: spinach sauteed with minced garlic, sauteed crimini mushrooms, left-over pork chop, thinly diced and crisped in a pan, and some crumbled feta cheese, along with the Organicville spaghetti sauce and some shredded mozzarella cheese mixed with chopped fresh basil.

Our first cheese crust pizza! Mushrooms on one half only 😉

 

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Buffalo Chicken Salad {Low Carb, Grain Free}

Buffalo Chicken Salad with Blue Cheese Dressing

Last night we were looking for something to do with our leftover baked (GF) chicken from the previous evening, and we were in the mood for a salad. I also had some blue cheese on hand, so decided to make my easy blue cheese dressing, which led to this Buffalo Chicken Salad…

  • chopped greens (we used romaine and iceberg lettuce)
  • sliced fresh tomato
  • chopped cooked chicken tossed in a sauce made from 2Tb melted butter and 1/4C GF hotsauce
  • homemade blue cheese dressing
  • chopped celery

That’s it, super easy and delicious, as well as low carb!

 

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Chocolate Chip Cookies with Almond Flour {Grain free and Low Carb!}

Almond Flour Chocolate Chip Cookies

Even those of us enjoying a grain-free and low-carb lifestyle have a hankering for a classic treat from time to time! The trick is to minimize the damaging ingredients (such as grains and sugar) and maximize the flavors. Almond flour is a natural fit for this recipe, as the nuttiness matches well to the dark chocolate. To keep the carbs low, be sure to get chips with as high of a cocoa content as possible, aiming for 85% (you may even want to buy a dark chocolate bar and break into small pieces.)  As many of us also have children and teens in the house (not to mention husbands!) it’s helpful to be able to provide “sweets” that make them feel a little more normal, while knowing that we are supporting good health at the same time!

I adapted this from a recipe from the extremely talented Elana, and you can find it here on her blog. The changes I made were to switch away from grapeseed oil, as it’s not compliant with the Wheat Belly eating plan, and to switch out the agave syrup as well, for the same reason. Hope you enjoy these as much as we do!

Baked on ParchmentAlmond Flour Chocolate Chip Cookies

  • 2 1/2 C blanched almond flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 C healthy oil (I used half butter and half virgin coconut oil)
  • 1 Tb vanilla extract
  • 1/2 C powdered erythritol
  • 1/2 C dark chocolate chips
  • 1/4 chopped walnuts (optional)
  1. Preheat oven to 350. In a large bowl, mix together dry ingredients.
  2. In a medium bowl, mix together wet ingredients. If you are using butter and/or coconut oil, be sure they are melted into liquid form.
  3. Mix the wet into the dry, combine completely. Fold in chocolate chips and nuts (if using.)
  4. Place in flattened circles on a parchment-lined sheet, using about 1 Tb per cookie.
  5. Bake for about 7 minutes, or until the edges are browned. The original recipe suggests 7-10 min, but they get dark very quickly, so do keep an eye on them.
  6. Remove whole sheet of parchment to a wire rack to cool, or set the entire pan in a safe place to cool. If the cookies are moved before they cool 10-15 minutes, they will crumble and fall apart. They firm up as they cool though. Makes 18 cookies.

Note: Made with 60% cocoa Ghirardelli chocolate chips, there are about 4.4 net carbs per cookie. If you use a higher cocoa chocolate chip, you can get that number even lower.
***Adding an egg is optional, if you would like. It does help the cookie hold together a little easier, but I think it makes it a little softer. Great either way!

Gooey Goodness

 

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Recipe: Frozen Raspberry Cheesecake Bars {Gluten Free}

How would you like a decadent frozen treat that adds up low in carbs, but high in taste and satisfaction? Just in time for the holidays? I used my 9″x9″ square stone baking dish for this, and cut it into 20 bars. By my calculations, following this recipe, that is under 4g of carbs per piece! Guilt-free and perfect timing for your 4th of July celebrations.

It seems that lately, I’ve been focusing a lot more on information about the wheat free, low carb lifestyle, than I have about the food! Trust me folks, I am still cooking and baking… and taking pictures and writing notes, but with summer so busy, I haven’t had as much time to pass the recipes along to you! Well, sometimes it just takes something REALLY special to break a pattern, and this recipe is it! MMMMM.

I had been thinking for a while that the crust recipe in Raspberry Streusel Bars would be a fabulous cheesecake crust, and that became the first layer in these yummy bars. Made with almond flour, butter and Truvia, it makes for a delicious cookie-style crust that stands up well to the other ingredients. Layer 2 is all about cheesecake! Rich and thick, it gives the real substance to this treat. The 3rd layer is where the raspberry comes in, though you could certainly change this up with your favorite flavors or experiment. Top it all off with a layer of sweetened whipping cream, and you have an amazing summer treat. While serving it chilled would be great, frozen was fabulous!

And don’t fret….. it may seem like a long list of ingredients at first glance, but you will notice that several of the ingredients (whipping cream, sour cream, vanilla, sweeteners) are used in more than one layer. It was just easier to list them separately for assembly purposes.

Frozen Raspberry Cheesecake Bars

Crust Layer:

  • 2C blanched almond flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 2T butter (or coconut oil )
  • 1T vanilla extract
  • 1T water
  • 1 tsp Truvia or other sweetener

Cheesecake Layer:

  • 8oz package cream cheese, softened
  • 1/2C sour cream
  • 1T vanilla
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 4Tb erythritol

Raspberry Layer:

  • 1/2 C heavy whipping cream
  • 1/4 C sour cream
  • 1T erythritol
  • 1C Smucker’s low sugar raspberry preserves

Whipped Topping:

  • 1/2C heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tsp Truvia
  • 1T vanilla

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2. Make the crust: blend all crust ingredients together in a food processor. Line a 9″ by 9″ baking dish with parchment and press crust mixture firmly into pan. Bake for 15 minutes (I turn my pan halfway through baking.) Remove from oven and set aside

3. Make cheesecake filling: In a stand mixer, beat softened cream cheese until smooth. Add sour cream and beat to combine. Add eggs one at a time, beating after each addition. Add vanilla and erythritol and beat (on medium) until well-combined, but not whipped. Pour over crust and smooth out. Bake for 20 minutes, turned pan halfway through baking to ensure even cooking. Remove and let cool completely.

4. Make raspberry layer: Whip the cream until it begins to get stiff. Add sour cream, and erythritol and beat to combine. Fold in the raspberry preserves. Spread over the cooled cheesecake layer. Chill for 15 minutes to firm up.

5. Make the topping: Whip the cream on medium high until soft peaks begin to form. Add vanilla and Truvia and continue whipping until firm. Spread over raspberry layer. Chill or freeze completely before serving. Cut into 20 bars. (Tip, To cut while frozen, I scored the top and then used my food blade to press through.)

Makes 20 servings; 4g carbs each.

 

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When a Diet isn’t a Diet (Or how my husband and I have lost 44 lbs in 12 weeks)

What if I told you that by omitting ONE food, our overall health and weight are steadily improving? Would you think that going without one ingredient is something you could do if the health benefits were not only weight loss, but also improved overall health?

Do you struggle with any of the following? (Likely more than one…)

You might be thinking to yourself, “Well, of course I do! Who doesn’t?” Kind of like a disreputable psychic who makes general statements which are likely to apply to a wide range of people and situations, the list raises skepticism.  However, it is precisely BECAUSE these symptoms are so widespread that people should be more concerned about having them, not less. A widespread collection of symptoms might just point to a widespread contaminant or cause. Does that make sense?

There are countless over-the-counter drugs that one can buy to try to get a handle on these awful feelings. If you were to go to your doctor and complain about these symptoms, the likely result would be a prescription for a pharmaceutical to ease the symptom only. Maybe they would request a test or 3 first and then still write a prescription.

However, how many physicians really dig into the causes of these things, especially occurring together? How many ask what you are eating? How many ask whether you have tried to lose weight and whether any methods were successful? My bet is VERY FEW. Why? Because even the medical profession has accepted that these symptoms are normal or average in our society, and are signs of perhaps aging or the general stress of living, even though they occur in children and teens as well as adults! (Not to mention, who would purchase all the over-the-counter meds and prescription drugs if people were to fix these problems with DIET alone?)

Finding the “Key” to good health

As citizens of planet Earth, we are faced with countless health choices and challenges in our everyday living. Some rely solely on pharmaceutical solutions to manage their symptoms; some use a combination of meds and natural approaches. Many of us have been delving for years into the natural keys to our own personal health, trying to discover what makes us feel the best and what makes us hurt, deciding which foods are “golden” and which are damaging our body systems, which combination of foods and activities will help us to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight and fitness level. It matters to some of us, a whole lot. It seems like it can be so much work to keep up with the conflicting information and possible schools of thought, that it can be frustrating trying to make real and lasting changes for ourselves and our families.

It doesn’t help that the waters are muddied by corporate voices that speak with profit as a primary goal, rather than distributing critical health information. I have no intention of sounding extremist or alarmist when I discuss the state of human health, but I do think that many people, even those who believe they are eating “right” or “healthy” are instead eating themselves into clinics, hospitals and even graves. The worst part of it is that while some people have a casual disregard for health matters, there are many who have the very best intentions, and are unfortunately operating on misinformation, rather than apathy or ignorance.

If you are like me, you have been hoping that at some point the light would shine down, illuminating some “truth” that you missed, and things would click into place.  That there would be some key that makes so much sense that you can’t believe you didn’t figure it out sooner.

Well, I am happy to say, we have figured it out! (For us, anyway.) I’d like to think that it’s the same key that might work for you. I’m just thankful that I heard the message enough times from other people passing through my life that I actually tuned in, and investigated! People on gluten free diets were talking about the major positive health impact that one change has made…

We gave up WHEAT, and our health and weight is steadily improving!


I believe that most people have had, at the very least, an inkling that processed carbohydrates are “bad”, or that there are better choices out there than foods with “empty calories.”  Reaching for a cookie, cupcake, candy bar, or slice of pizza usually is met with delicious anticipation as well as a pang of guilt for many people.  We brush it aside and think, well, it’s just one… or we remember that we did have a salad for lunch, which was a healthy choice. Or maybe we think that it’s a whole grain bran muffin, or that it’s a whole wheat pizza crust… that has some merit, right? We are getting our daily allowance of grains (the government tells us we NEED whole grains!) along with our veggies, fruits, proteins…

Except that many common grains in the wheat family contain gluten, which wreaks havoc on our bodies! It is true that some people are more sensitive to it than others, there are a wide range of effects from gluten sensitivity to celiac disease, however, if you are suffering any of the symptoms on that list, there’s a chance that wheat could be impacting your health and your life. (Click HERE for an extensive list of diseases associated with wheat consumption) Also, carbohydrates, whether they are wheat-based or not, spike blood sugar and can cause visceral fat, insulin resistance and diabetes.

I can only speak from my own perspective and on behalf of my own research and my family’s experience when I relate our stories in my articles and on my blog. As I say that, I am always hoping that the information strikes a chord with someone who is also looking for a health solution, and that they will give wheat-free and gluten-free living a try. (Buy Wheat Belly” by Dr. Davis, and the information will blow you away. And, if you are like me, it will spur you on to start reading even more, and question even more, and start following a path that seems to be more enlightening every day. Also, visit GreenMedInfo.com for a wealth of real research articles that will open your eyes!)

Back to the title, and why I say that this diet, isn’t a diet.

From what I have seen and read, I believe that our bodies have different norms in weight and shape, depending on how we eat. Our bodies adjust to a balance, and that balance can only be maintained by continuing to eat a certain way. If you change back to old eating habits, you will change back to your old weight and health status. It really is that simple. If you continue down a new food path (or “diet”), and stay there, your body will adjust to a new normal for that lifestyle, and that is where you will likely remain. To me, the term “diet” has the connotation of a temporary change to meet a weight loss or health goal. Maybe the word “program” would be better? No, programs tend to have a beginning and end as well. Hmmmm, I think “LIFESTYLE”, as it refers to a more holistic and long term approach or state of being. (Here is what Dr. Davis has to say about the diet not being a diet.)

At any rate, I am very interested to see where my own weight will stabilize, eating a gluten free diet, and very little sugar or processed carbohydrates. The things that we have deleted from our diet, we have no intention of ever eating again, because we know how bad they are for our health, not just our weight. That makes all the difference in the world!

There is a mental difference between mildly suspecting that a substance is harmful, and having evidence that it is. Between the research I have done, and the personal (anecdotal) experience, I am certain that wheat and sugar are extremely damaging to our bodily systems.

Since we are a real family, living in a real world with friends, family, co-workers and the like, and we will share meals with these people in our lives at times, it is natural that conversation about the way we choose to eat will be a recurring topic. The reactions from people vary from curiosity or support, to scorn, disbelief, or sort of shaking heads in pity that we are living our lives without the almighty grain, and even anger in some cases! At first it was a little disheartening, but now it evokes a sense of empathy in us, because we were where they are… and not so long ago. We know that it can sound alien to hear people talking about ridding their diets of wheat (specifically the gluten protein, gliadin) and people wonder if there is anything to our way of eating, or if it is merely another “fad” diet.

Well, for starters, we have never been fad dieters. We have always attempted to eat healthy as a primary goal, and have looked into information about real wellness and good foods to eat. Even though we have struggled with some excess weight over the years, and would be more than happy to lose it, our eating routines have mainly been formed with increased overall health in mind, not merely losing pounds.

At one point in the past we did engage in a low fat diet, where we ate lots of veggies, fruits, lean meats, and low fat snacks (carbs included), but avoided oils and fats like the plague. During that time, we did lose weight, but there was always this imminent sense that we couldn’t wait to reach our target weight, our goal, so that we could be done with this torturous process! We were often HUNGRY! (set up to FAIL)

Now, any of you who have dieted, probably understand that conflict. Even though we were trying to convince ourselves that the way we were eating was healthy, our bodies were in real need of the healthy fats that we were going without. Also, the carbohydrates that we were eating, we may have been burning off (I exercised a LOT), but they left us feeling hungry and unsatisfied… which leads to the yearning for the diet to end! The problem with waiting for a diet to end is that once it ends, eventually you will end up gaining weight back.

That is precisely what is different about eating this way. We went through a period of getting off wheat, and processed foods (a couple weeks of cravings and detox), however once we were clean, our outlook felt “clean” as well! We don’t have those awful cravings; we get full and satisfied from our meals; we enjoy choosing healthful foods, because we know that they are fueling and nourishing our systems with the components they need. The fats in our diet are good for our organs and mind, feel satisfying, and are pretty much self-regulating when combined with all the healthy veggies we eat, as well as a wide variety of meats, nuts, some fruit, hard cheeses and some (low lactose) dairy. We have cut processed sugar out of our diet by at least 90%. Our teenage son will “cheat” with sugar, but he never cheats with wheat on purpose (that teen is a good label-reader!) I do use agave nectar now and then, even though it is a sugar (and not on the Wheat Belly program), because it absorbs more slowly into the blood stream, avoiding the spikes in blood sugar. This is an exception though and why I can’t say we’re 100% without sugars.

People ask if we are tempted to cheat… umm no. If we were feeling hungry and unsatisfied, we might be tempted, but since we feel good and have an awareness now of when we are full (no false signals from our brain, caused by the exorphins in wheat) we have no compulsive desire to eat wheat-containing foods. We know very well how wheat makes us feel!  (Chronic: migraines, joint and muscle pain, IBS digestive issues, and acid reflux are the most noticeable for us on a daily basis.)

My husband and I have lost 22 pounds EACH since the end of March (12 weeks) and the weight change just slowly continues to happen. When you start getting into those numbers, people start to notice, and the people who shook their heads before, are now beginning to get curious about what is happening, and why it’s working.  It’s like certain people are hoping to uncover some conspiracy or flaw in the thinking that allows them to dismiss our process because it makes them uncomfortable to believe wheat is unhealthy. No one wants to believe that their trusted dietary staple is bad for them. No one wants to think they are addicted.

The next paragraph is important.

Some point out that the lack of breads is leaving a calorie hole in our diet, so THAT is why we lose weight. (As if that statement is all-encompassing.) Well, there may be (or may not be) fewer calories, but if it was only due to decreased calories, wouldn’t the expected result be increased hunger?
Hmmmm. Think about that for a minute. That is what happened when we dropped fats on a low fat diet (and the calories that went with fats.) We did consume fewer calories, but we were always hungry and looking for ways to cope with that hunger. It was sabotaged before we ever reached our goal, because no one can be happy and healthy if they are always battling hunger.

This is totally different. We eat less because our bodies are satisfied, and our brains aren’t playing tricks on us and telling us that we need more, and SOON. We simply don’t need as much food as those who are still eating wheat (like we used to.) The healthy fats and lack of gliadin-induced hunger pangs make for a much easier way to live healthy and lose weight.

If we need a snack, we eat one… but to be honest, that doesn’t happen nearly as often as it once did, and the snacks we choose sit well with us, and a small amount is very satisfying. A couple bites of cheese, a few nuts and a piece of fruit, nut butter on a celery stalk, a smoothie, or maybe parmesan crackers, a piece of raspberry streusel or something else made with almond flour or coconut flour… Those are enough to give the body some fuel, and to help us stay on track. Our systems feel like they are running cleaner, and we enjoy our food even more than we did before.

Here is my hope

For those of you who not only want to lose weight, but want to feel better overall, and take a shot at addressing some chronic health problems that you may have been facing for most of your life, I urge you to give this LIFESTYLE a try. DELETE the WHEAT.

If you are curious, engage in a little web surfing. Visit the Wheat Belly Blog by Dr. Davis and friend Wheat Belly on Facebook. Explore GreenMedInfo.com… There are countless research articles which address gluten and wheat, and there are also countless success stories on blogs from people who are enjoying improved health. If you need tips and recipes, there are plenty of those too! People who are eating this way are vocal and excited, and want to share. This article is full of links to relevant information, but know that they are just the tip of the iceberg, and that there is much more information available to those who choose to look.

 

What do we eat? According to Dr. Davis, the basis of the Wheat Belly diet:

Eat real, natural foods such as eggs, raw nuts, plenty of vegetables, and fish, fowl, and meats. Use healthy oils like olive, walnut, and coconut liberally. Eat occasional fruit and plenty of avocado, olives, and use herbs and spices freely. Eat raw or least cooked whenever possible and certainly do not frequent fast food, processed snacks, or junk foods.

This is a very simplified summary, taken from the FAQs on his blog (The diet also allows real cultured cheeses.) You can find more information about specifics on the Wheat Belly blog and in his book.

What’s in it for me? Why do people like me take the time to tell others about this? Why am I writing articles and posting recipes to get people to think more deeply and to make the switch to gluten free eating easier? Because when you make a personal health discovery, it is hard to stay quiet about it! Because I wish that I had known this, decades ago! Because I know you love your families as much as I love mine, and want to make healthy choices, especially ones that will have a real impact!

~Good luck to you in your health quest, and Cheers!

 

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