RSS

Tag Archives: marinades

Crunchy Hot Wings and Blue Cheese

OK, first things first… if you are a chicken purist, and think that parboiling is akin to software pirating, please discontinue reading and forget you were ever here!

On the other hand, if you don’t mind some kitchen short-cuts to yummy, crunchy wings, that aren’t deep fried, you are in luck! This is the wings method I have been using for several years, though I don’t recall quite where the idea came from. I vary the sauce depending on what we are craving, and what’s in the fridge, but this is a pretty basic mild hot-wings style I have going here. It’s reassuring that one of our faves does NOT have to be altered to be gluten-free! I am watching the carbs though, so I stayed away from the sweet sauce this time around.

First, the Blue Cheese Dressing: Again, I admit that I really don’t measure things that I make frequently. To make a small batch of dressing, I would use about 4oz softened cream cheese, 1/4C mayo (regular or light), a few tablespoons of crumbled blue cheese or Gorgonzola, freshly ground black pepper, and maybe a pinch of rice wine vinegar. Combine well, and refrigerate for an hour or so to let the flavors come together. Simple! If it is too thick when you remove it from the fridge, just add a little milk.

To make the Wings: Thaw chicken wing sections (if frozen) and cover with water in a stock pot. Bring to a boil and cook for about 10 minutes. Next, line a cookie sheet with foil to make clean-up easier, and arrange wings. Broil on medium heat for 8-10 minutes, turn over and finish broiling another 8-10 minutes until wings are crispy and cooked through.

Sauce: Meanwhile, whip up a sauce of your choosing to coat the wings. I used about 1/4 cup of Frank’s RedHot sauce, a few tablespoons of butter and a dash of Ken’s Steakhouse Lite Raspberry Vinaigrette dressing, heated in the microwave about 90 seconds, until the butter melts. (I have also used Asian marinades, BBQ sauce, minced garlic, fresh ginger, dried ginger, sesame oil, soy, hot pepper flakes, pretty much anything you enjoy.) Place the wings in a large bowl and pour the sauce over the top; toss to coat.

Kitchen Tip: I usually serve with celery and sometimes carrot sticks. I don’t know if it’s just me, but I get just as excited about celery leaves as I do about the celery stalks! I always save the leaves and dry them so that I can add them to soups. I just put the leaves on a paper plate and rearrange them every so often to help them dry over the course of a couple days. I think I may be one of the only people who choose their celery by how many leaves they have!

Advertisements
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Soy Sauce is Made of Wheat? You bet it is, Cupcake.

(Most soy sauces are, at any rate.)

In many products, the wheat and gluten is obvious. In other things… not so much. I have always used soy sauce in my marinades and with sushi, and I had no idea whatsoever that it contained wheat. This means that other products that use soy sauce may also contain wheat. Marinades, seasonings, salad dressings and some snack foods contain it as well. We were quite surprised when a package of beef jerky listed wheat as an ingredient! My son asked me why on earth they would put wheat in beef jerky (not just from the soy), and the fact is that it is used as a filler in a wide array of products. Wheat is cheap compared to other ingredients, and it makes other things go further. It might also explain why some of us feel awful when we were nowhere near a bowl of pasta or a slice of bread!

I was able to find GF (gluten-free) Tamari soy sauce online pretty easily at Amazon and Vitacost, but my local stores didn’t have it. I did find it in a neighboring town at Kroger, in both regular and low-sodium versions, and at a reasonable price.

If you usually buy prepared marinades, don’t despair, homemade marinades are a cinch, and usually taste a lot better too! So in honor of GF soy sauce, here is a combination of ingredients that I use as a wonderful marinade for meats. I say combination because honestly I do NOT measure when I put these things together, however I realize that not everyone feels comfortable using that method in the kitchen. For those that need measurements, please note that my quantities are approximations and that I just tweak it ‘til it tastes the way I want it to.

Asian Steak Marinade:

¼ Cup GF soy sauce
Juice from ½ lime
1Tb Olive Oil (walnut oil or sesame oil is nice too, though the flavor is stronger)
1 tsp Molasses (or honey)
1 Tb grated fresh ginger (I keep my gingerroot in the freezer, and just grate it as needed)
¼ tsp Cayenne pepper
1 Tb or so freshly minced Cilantro
1 or 2 thinly sliced scallions or a clove of minced garlic
Freshly ground pepper to taste
½ tsp of toasted sesame seeds

Combine all ingredients thoroughly, and pour over steak or chops, let rest at least 15 minutes, and grill or broil as usual.
This should make enough for 2-3 steaks or chops, just adjust the ingredients if you have more to marinade.

I want to stress that I really do just “wing it” and use a base and season it up from there. Soy sauce, some sort of citrus or vinegar for the sour, a touch of good oil, a touch of sweet, a touch of heat, and some herbs and spices, and you are good to go. I tend to use what I keep on hand, and that may differ from your kitchen, so if you don’t have exact ingredients, don’t let that stop you!

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: